Spacecraft Mission News (English, German) – 14.03.19

Front Page / Titelseite

Where We Are

Emily Lakdawalla introduces an at-a-glance spacecraft locator to The Planetary Report.
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via Planetary Society Blog https://ift.tt/QRHOCj

Methan auf Mars muss kein Hinweis auf Leben sein

Als der im Sommer 2012 im Rahmen der Nasa-Mission „Mars Science Laboratory“ im Gale-Krater abgesetzte Rover Curiosity Ausbrüche des Gases Methan registrierte, und mehr noch, als die Messungen mit dem Laser-Spektrometer an Bord des Robotfahrzeugs jahreszeitliche Schwankungen des Methan-Anteils in der dünnen Mars-Atmosphäre zeigten, gerieten die Forscher auf der Erde in Aufregung. Denn auf der Erde deutet so etwas zumeist auf biologische Aktivität…
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via Astronomie.de – Der große Feed mit allen News https://ift.tt/2hhCviI

Amidst Cuts to NASA, Mars Sample Return May Finally Happen

The President’s Budget Request for NASA in 2020 would start a Mars Sample Return mission and ramp up efforts to send humans to the Moon. But it would still kick off the first year of a new decade with a half-billion dollar cut to the space agency.
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via Planetary Society Blog https://ift.tt/QRHOCj

SwRI-led LAMP instrument sheds light on lunar water movement

Using the Southwest Research Institute-led Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), scientists have observed water molecules moving around the dayside of the Moon. A paper published in Geophysical Research Letters describes how LAMP measurements of the sparse layer of molecules temporarily stuck to the surface helped characterize lunar hydration changes over the course of a day. Up until the last decade or so, scientists thought the Moon was arid, with any water existing mainly as pockets of ice in permanently shaded craters near the poles. More recently, scientists have identified surface water in sparse populations of molecules bound to the lunar soil, or regolith. The amount and locations vary based on the time of day. This water is more common at higher latitudes and tends to hop around as the surface heats up.
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via Southwest Research Institute https://www.swri.org

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